suffering

I read a lot.  I enjoy biographies, history and stories about random stuff.  I have read books about the rats in NYC, coal (yes the stuff we burn) and Hershey's history.  I am always so impressed by the struggling and suffering people endure.  And how this hurdle or that hurdle or whatever horrible situation someone faces they still power on.  I worry often that my children do not suffer enough.  Every morning my children climb out of their warm bed, throw their pjs in the laundry so they can be cleaned after one night, put on clean clothes, go downstairs to have whatever they would like for breakfast, grab their cute backpacks and head off to great schools to get educated.  Would I change any of this?  No.  But, I think often how and where can my children gain some grit, some struggles, some work ethic.  How and where can my children face some tough stuff and overcome it and feel on top of the world?  I try to give my kids natural situations where they feel a little pain.  Saturday I had all four of them outside for hours picking up leaves.  Their hands were cold, their noses were running, when they fell it hurt worse because of the cold, but when we counted up 24 leaf bags filled to the top we had cheers, smiles and high fives.  I want these guys to know they have it good, I am pretty sure Ian is figuring it out.  The other day Teddy threw his jacket on a table at a restaurant and it landed on a candle.  His jacket caught on fire.  He knew I was upset because it was careless.  As I was fixing the jacket that night with duct tape, Ian asked what happened.  I told him the story and that Teddy asked for a new coat and Ian started laughing.  He knew there would be no way I would be purchasing Teddy a new coat.  So I think Ian is getting it a little bit.  I love our kids so much, and I try not to let my love interfere with their opportunities to live whether it be good living or tough living. XO

P.S.  Teddy won $10 and a box of licorice for selling the most raffle tickets for the school in auction in his class.  And I was thinking to myself I should continue the celebration and take the kids out to dinner to celebrate and let Teddy choose where we go.  Then I thought again, why not let the accolades he got from his class, the $10 and the licorice be enough?  Because it is enough.  I told him I was proud of him, he earned it.  He dressed up in his school uniform on the weekends and went door knocking to sell his tickets.  And he sold his plus two other kids in his class.  Just something to think about . . .